Another tentacle or two and I’m done for!

The Marconi Octopus Liberal Party – “Another tentacle or two and I’m done for!” published in Punch, or the London Charivari, on June 18th 1913. The name ‘Marconi Octopus’ was derived from the Marconi Company who received a large  contract from the UK government to build six radio stations to ‘linking Britain to the Empire’ (1). […]

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Cartoon by Geoff Pryor, published in the Canberra Times on 6 June 1979. The octopus has its limbs tattooed as “Narc[otics] Bureau”, “Police”, “Politicians”, “Traffickers”, and “Pushers”. The only players not part of the octopus (or complicit) are the dealer(?) and buyer. Relates to the Australian Federal Police Act of 1979. This later (October 1979) resulted in the […]

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Cartoon by Peter Schrank, published in the ‘Independent on Sunday’, on the 23rd Mar 1997. More sleazy tentacles in the ’Cash for Questions’ affair. Image Source: The British Cartoon Archive – University of Kent

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“Sleaze"by Peter Schrank, Published in ‘The Independent’ on the 7th Oct 1996. Relates to the ‘Cash for Questions’ Affair. See also: David Brown cartoon. Image Source: The British Cartoon Archive – University of Kent

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The cartoon by Dave Brown was published in the Sunday Times on the 6th Oct 1996, at the end of the “Cash for Questions” affair. The people illustrated are1: Ian Greer (the Octopus), David Linsay Willetts (left of octopus), Mohamed Al-Fayed (right of octopus, entangled in tentacle), Former British PM John Major (right of octopus – glasses, entangled in tentacle), and Neil […]

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The Devil Fish of Californian Politics (Walter, 1889) The cartoon was published in The Wasp, v. 22, Jan. – June 1889 and ’shows “highbinder” caught in tentacles of Buckley octopus’1. The caption reads ‘The Devil Fish of Californian Politics’ with a sub caption ‘ECSS Buckley’s rapacious maw equal to anything from a state capitol to an […]

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Well, Brother, will you let the beast have your vote, too? (Bowles, 1894) Agricultural monopoly. Relates to the Alabama gubernatorial election in 1894. According to the image source (Alabama Department of Archives and History) this was run for Reuben Kolb who ran for the Populist Party. Kolb was defeated due to electoral fraud by the Democrats […]

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